Cash for Diabetic Test StripsKnowing what’s best for you to eat on a daily basis will help to regulate the way glucose produces your energy. Drink water, eat adequate fiber, and other food groups in proper percentage for best results.

Eating and Diabetes: What you eat is, of course, important. It’s the fuel that drives a body. While that’s true for everyone, it is especially important for those with diabetes to pay very close attention to what kind of fuel you are eating. Your diet is perhaps the most critical thing to pay attention to when you have been diagnosed with either Type I or Type II diabetes. Given the importance of your diet, it would be wise to consult an expert in the field. Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) or dieticians would be quite helpful in planning your future diet.

Your food intake must be balanced with the insulin present so the blood glucose is effectively used. The first step is to keep yourself at a healthy weight, which includes BMI (Body Mass Index). Rather than use only your weight to determine what’s healthy, the BMI is calculated to include the amount of fat present in your body. Calculators are easy to find on the internet to help you determine your BMI without you doing the mathematical formula.

Your food intake must be balanced with the insulin present so the blood glucose is effectively used.

Carb intake should not exceed 65% of what you eat in a day. The best numbers there according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists are 55 to 60% of daily consumption. You do need carbs, as they are broken down into glucose to provide you with your energy.

Fiber, although it’s considered a carb, helps to lower the levels of glucose, which is very important for diabetics of all types. Eating 25 to 50 grams of fiber each day is recommended. Adequate fiber can be consumed at the same time you eat your carbs by choosing high fiber carbohydrates. Whole grain cereal, pasta, and breads, brown rice, fruit, vegetables, nuts, and beans or lentils are all examples of high fiber carbs.

  • Your diet is perhaps the most critical thing to pay attention to when you have been diagnosed with either Type I or Type II diabetes.
  • Carb intake should not exceed 65% of what you eat in a day
  • Fiber, although it’s considered a carb, helps to lower the levels of glucose, which is very important for diabetics of all types.

Fat consumption is ideal at 25 to 30% and protein at between 11 and 18% of the total daily diet. The best proteins are lean and include white chicken meats, white turkey meats, soy, and egg whites. Soy is important as it reduces cholesterol.

When you are diabetic, the glucose can’t be used for energy because the insulin is needed to move it into the appropriate position. If you don’t produce adequate insulin, glucose is unable to move into the cells as needed. Type I diabetics don’t produce insulin and it must be artificially introduced. Type II diabetics produce insulin but it isn’t strong enough to transport the glucose into the cells from the bloodstream.

You may find yourself having extra strips frequently or occasionally. There are many reasons people have extra strips including the doctor changing your machine, testing yourself less frequently, a loved one goes into a nursing home that provides the test strips for them…and many more. If your boxes of strips meet our buying criteria, we can pay you cash the same day. We will pay for the boxes of strips and shipping via check or paypal, whichever you prefer. We have many repeat sellers because we pay fast and provide exceptional customer service! We purchase boxes that are not expired and are unopened.

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